Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Recovered

This past summer, one of the moms from the neighborhood and I started to chat. She asked me if I thought anyone in the 'hood would take her old couch if she put it on our neighborhood's Yahoo group. I'm pretty sure I pounced and said I could come get it later that day. Free couch from someone I know and trust (aka no scary bugs)? Hand it over! She told me that it was an awesome and very comfortable couch that just needed to be recovered. 

Luckily, my soon-to-be-sister-in-law got a couch recovered last year with a local guy and had a really good experience, so I felt confident I could recover it successfully. Plus, I figured that if we got the couch and it wasn't any good we could always donate it or give it away like she had planned to initially. John and I went by later that day to check it out, and I was very pleasantly surprised.



The fabric was dated, but the couch was a cute shape and was very comfy. I planned to remove the skirt, which revealed that the legs underneath were very skinny and made it look like a 500 lb man on toothpick legs. Sadly I didn't get a picture of them... but they were between the thickness of a beer bottle and its neck. That meant I'd need to beef them up... but more on that later. 

You may remember that I thought I had already picked the fabric we'd recover it with, but the more I saw it the less happy I was with it. It was too dark, too forrest green, and left too much of a mark when you rubbed it in different directions. I'm pretty sure that I'd always be compelled to rub it after I stood up to make it lay in a certain way, and that would be ridiculous.

So it was back to the drawing board. I got some swatches and held them up to the wall the couch would be against to get an idea of how they'd look.

I found a pretty navy fabric that was too dark...


I also found a nice blueish grey (it was a little bluer in person than it is in this picture) and was also still interested in one of the green ones I originally considered that I just kept coming back to. I really liked the blueish grey one, but it didn't look good with the walls. They were too similar. So, I decided to go with the green one. This picture is pretty true to color--it's kind of a light olivey sea foam green. It's a smidge retro, so I crossed my fingers that it wouldn't look dated once it was all over a couch.


Lucky for me, it was on a mega sale. When I first looked at it, it was on clearance for $10/yard. When I went back a few months later... it was 50% off of that. $5/yard is mega cheap yall, especially for upholstery fabric. This couch cost us just about nothing. Somehow, having the whole couch covered actually makes the fabric feel brighter and less drab, when I was worried it would do the opposite. Here it is, with new chunky legs we found on Ebay. The legs don't make any sort of statement and look like they've been there the entire time, which is how it should be.


What do you think? It's seriously comfortable and we are super lucky to have gotten it for free, so I'm beyond happy with it.


You may have seen it in my before & after post hanging out in the loft with some Home Goods and Crate & Barrel pillows.


We are pretty clearly still lacking a lot of art... but we'll get there. Now that we're married and actually living here, I find myself sitting on the couch watching TV rather than getting things done. I need a little break, because I just spent four straight months working on this place and I'm just a litttttle bit tired.  

5 comments:

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  2. Hi Claire!

    It looks great. When I saw the couch on an earlier post, I swore for a second that they were the same as ours - we have an Ashley set that is the same shade of sea-foam!

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    1. Thanks! We were super lucky to get it in such nice shape and then get that suuuper discounted fabric. It may as well be brand new!
      :)

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  3. how much did it cost for the labor to get the couch fabric added?

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